Daniel-Quilter-of-Fuze-Ecoteer-podcast-demonstrating-virtual-field-trips

Podcast: Daniel Quilter | Fuze Ecoteer

Daniel Quilter fell in love with Malaysia, its wildlife and people during a field trip while at University. He quickly returned and in many ways never looked back. Since 2005, has been setting up eco enterprises which are businesses which help people and the planet.

During this podcast we talk about Fuze Ecoteer, a Malaysian based experience provider which connects people with wildlife. We explore the projects they run and how people benefit from them. We also discuss how to choose the right volunteer or internship experience for you and what questions to ask.

Finally, we explore Daniel’s career to date, his advice for people seeking to find careers within the conservation sector, along with his idea for what we can do to make a big impact on this precious little planet of ours. So if you love travel, Asia or are interested in volunteering or interning overseas, this is a great episode for you. Enjoy. 

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Audio Transcript 

Dan   

Hi, my name is Daniel Quilter from Fuze Ecoteer. 

Nick   

Hey Dan, great to have you on the podcast. Thanks for jumping online. So we are here to talk about you and your career and Fuze Ecoteer as well, let’s start with Fuze if we can. So paint a little bit of a picture, you know what is Fuze Ecoteer for people who have never heard of you before? 

Dan   

Okay, so Fuze Ecoteer is actually a merger of two entities actually. One is Fuze, and one is Ecoteer. So myself, I actually started up Ecoteer back in 2005, after volunteering in Malaysia, and then in about 2013, I met my partner or my now partner, Pavin, who had this outward bound adventure company called Fuze. So we joined before some reason it be great to bring that a conservation entity which you could tell was with this outward bound expedition company and bring them together. And that’s how we created Fuze Ecoteer. 

Nick   

So I like the idea that you fused two things together and used the word Fuze as well. It just seems fun. 

Dan   

Yeah. People always think we named it that as well, because of the team building element as well, fusing people together. So our actual main mission or purpose is actually to connect people with nature. And so we believe that if you actually connect people, the participants but also the communities on the ground, we connect them with nature involved in conservation, then they’re more likely to actually love nature and protect it. That’s kind of like the whole ethos behind Fuze Ecoteer. We’re actually a social enterprise and not an NGO. One reason is because we believe that it’s more sustainable, we can try to generate our income by ourselves and have like an annual income rather than relying on donations we can be up and down. So we actually run a lot of school groups that’ll come over to Malaysia. Also corporate groups that come and do like volunteering with us as well as your volunteers who come for like three or four weeks and volunteer on our turtle projects or volunteer on our jungle trekking projects with the snares.  

Nick   

What sort of things do you offer people and if someone came out as part of one of your experiences, what sort of things do people get involved with? 

Dan   

Right so we’ve got a couple of products. We have our conservation projects, so people can volunteer for like two weeks up to like eight weeks with us. We have a turtle conservation project, diving in Coral Reef project in Perhentian Islands also we have a project in Taman Negara which is looking at part of it is looking at research with UMK in terms of flying squirrels, leopards and the other half is looking for snares and do like anti poaching patrols with the local people. And then also we have school groups and university field trips that come over to Malaysia. And they may come for like five days to like two weeks and they do like an expedition with us, where they’ll get to go to KL for a little while, then they go to the forest, and then they go to the island. So we’re actually just done a field course, with Portsmouth university, where it did that they went to KL for a couple of days. They went learned about the rain forests in Taman Negara. They did marine conservation work in Perhentian. 

Nick   

Fantastic. Yeah, and so you get students coming or other types of people kind of come into your projects? What motivates people to come as well? Yeah. 

Dan   

I think the main motivation is obviously you want to one thing you want to learn. This is about career improvement and learning. And this is sort of NGO, where is this the career I want to go in? Secondly it’s just kind of a do good holiday. And we’ve seen an increase now in families. I think back in like late 1990s, there were a lot of people doing gap years. Now 20 years on those gap yearers are now parents. So we’re finding that this gap year people are now actually coming back with their kids and doing volunteer and holidays. So we have a few, five or six families a year that come over and volunteer with us, which is great, actually, we love having the kids and getting the kids inspired into helping the turtles or to be recycling plastic with the kids in the Perhentian Islands. Yeah, it’s really heartfelt you know. 

 Nick   

I’ll probably put myself in that demographic too. Sort I did a gap year about 20 years ago and as young kids and not too distant future might be looking for these sorts of things.  

Dan   

Yeah, I mean, it’s a lot better than doing a holiday where you are going to sit around the pool. I mean, they’re great. There are some nice elements to that. But then if you have kind of a mixture of a holiday and a volunteering experience and give back, it’s the best. And it’s for me as well. I’ve got two kids as well and it’s nice way to connect with your kids. Instead of sat there like under the sun reading your book, you don’t connect with kids. But if you actually do like a lesson plan and thinking, how can we teach these kids about why you shouldn’t eat turtle eggs for instance, and you got to sit down with your children and try and discuss on how you can get children who are like similar age to be passionate about it. It’s a really good bonding experience. So yeah, I really love it. 

Nick   

That sounds cool. Voluntourism, internship provider space if you like globally is a really kind of quite a busy market. There are lots of people like yourself, you know, providing opportunities for people to go and get experience in the field, get their hands dirty, you know, and enjoy themselves as well. What kind of sets you apart from some of the other providers out there? And I guess related to that, do you have any advice for people about how to find a quality experience out there? Because let’s face it, there are good boys and, and bad boys in the market if you got any advice around that?  

Dan   

Yeah, I mean, this is one reason why I started Ecoteer in the first place actually is training to help students. At the time I was a student, and to try and get a career in conservation. So I really think the main things really in terms of looking for a good provider is asking questions. The more detailed questions you can ask and the more kind of like research you do online, you’ll find out. I mean, it’s very easy to tell a good project by a bad project. Saying that though running projects myself there’s always projects evolve over time. So when you do go on a project as well, I think it’s also comes with mentality of the volunteers as well. Projects do change over time, and sometimes it could be bit discrepancies in details. For instance, if you work with agents, you may even for us, I mean, we run what I’d call ethical programs, we get a very high happiness rate, the local people really like us, we got good reports and all that. But even with us, sometime things go wrong. It may rain all week, and you can’t do much about it. It could be that there’s an agent who maybe hasn’t updated their print as much as you’d like to, things like that. So just really, really ask questions.  

Nick   

What sort of questions should people be asking of their potential experience provider or typing into Google? You know, what would be the top ones you would, you know, at least get the right outcomes for you? 

Dan   

I mean, I definitely look at things like asking for reports, impact reports. Hmm, what have they done before? Not what is going to happen in the future? But what evidence have you done what’s actually happened? I think that’s really important, because people can say, oh, he’s got amazing plans, but actually, it’s what they’ve done is the stuff that’s important. So, asking them what has happened and evidence of it. Also asking for ex volunteers, their contact details, you can contact them directly yourself. But I mean, do bear in mind to have a pinch of salt, because obviously they’re going to give you an ex volunteer who had a great time as well. Yeah. So do that with a pinch of salt as well. Yeah, I mean, also, it’s, it’s about the country, you’re going to as well. It’s not just about the experience of learning about the conservation activities, but also it’s more about an immersion about the experience in the country. So I mean, people who go there, with kind of like a closed mind, like I know what is right it should be done this way. cultures and things is very, very important. And religion is very important in conservation, it makes things different. So you have to go there have an open mind and in terms of that as well. So, it’s yes, the project should be really good, but also as a volunteer, you should be open to different cultures and different things that happen. For instance, in Malaysia, it is not illegal to eat turtle eggs. It’s not illegal, like around majority of Malaysia, some areas it is, in some states, but in the states that we work, it’s not illegal to eat green turtle eggs. But then our volunteers get really upset if they see someone eating a turtle egg. Obviously you get really angry and some of our team get really angry. But what happens is, if they cause a fight with the local village, then what’s going to happen to us long term? Because for instance, in Perhentian, for example, is a great example where turtle egg poaching now is quite low. It’s not really the main threat. The main threat now I would say are actually the adults being killed by boats and by fishing nets. That’s the biggest threat now. But I mean, obviously it’s a direct, easy thing for volunteers to see. Okay, I see there is a turtle egg shell on the floor. Someone’s been eating turtle eggs so they get really angry about that. But they’ve been doing it all their time. It’s about education awareness and the volunteers, they then need to understand that the project’s there for a long term. They’re not there just with two weeks, four weeks, the project will be there for 10 years. So it’s over time and you know, change perceptions. It’s like the whole thing in UK with like foxhunting in Windsor that right? People want to do it, not saying it’s right. But people want to do it. So it’s understanding why they want to do it and why they do these things. So you have to yeah, be aware of it. 

Nick 

And what attributes should volunteers bring with them? Let me rephrase actually. So you must have had you know, a lot of volunteers come through your experiences over the years and some of them stood out as being really good, they’ve gone off, they’re flying in their careers as a result, perhaps have been aware of kind of, you know, local, you know, country sensitivities, like you just described. What other things should people bear in mind to get the most out their internship, what should they bring with them an attitude or a way of making the most of their experience?  

Dan 

Yeah, I think having an attitude where you want to get on and do things, that is really, really important. We get volunteers and interns that are really proactive and say that I think we can do this and do that. But obviously, knowing limitations I think is really important that the interns come with it. This kind of, yes, I can do it. And how can we do it? How can I work with you to get this done attitude? Yeah. 

Nick   

Yeah, like a partnership approach. Yeah.  

Dan   

Yeah. I mean, like, we’ve had some really awesome interns and also, you find that these projects that actually it’s not necessarily about your skill set, it is more so about how you get along with people, how you live with people. I say this to my project managers all the time that when you’re looking for interns, actually, it’s about harmony of the team, rather than actually the real detailed skill sets. So if everyone gets on and works well together, and is a good housemate, cooks you know, keeps things tidy. The team is so much more productive and happy. Everything then goes well. It is the partnership between you and the team and everyone it needs to be happy family. And then that integrates us, because in conservation projects is mainly most people who are working on the ground, they live and they sleep together, like everyone’s in the same place. Okay. It gets quite, we call it cabin fever. Cabin fever is very quick. So if you’ve got people who are a bit more helpful around the area, funny, like good music, things like that it’s just little things that keeps the mood up they’re the best interns. 

Nick   

That makes all the difference. 

Dan   

Work hard as well, work really hard.  

Nick   

Yeah.   

Dan   

And then ones that want to learn the local language. So try and learn the local language even if you can’t do it property or whatever. It doesn’t matter. I mean, like people will laugh at you but it’ll break the ice with the local communities as well. 

Nick   

Yes, that’s great advice. Great advice. So you talked about sort of your briefly about your experience of setting up Fuze and why and why you did that. And you mentioned that you did it as part of university experience. In the first instance, you went out to Malaysia as an intern, is that right? So, have been kind of career steps so far? Where did this all start? 

 Dan   

So actually, Ecoteer started back in 2005. And I was a student at the time, and I did environment science and I realised at that time, like Facebook wasn’t that big. It was more MySpace. 

 Nick   

Oh back in the day.  

Dan   

Yeah back in the day here, and then the NGOs weren’t really that active on social media. So I realised there was quite a big hole in the market where having internships and the people couldn’t find each other, like the projects, the NGOs, the ecologists. So I wrote to lots and lots of ecologists and projects all around the world. And I was quite amazed that a lot of them wanted interns to come help them. But they didn’t know how. So I personally went away for an experience in Borneo with Albert Teo and the Borneo, Ecotourism Eco Lodge. And it was absolute amazing, crazy amazing experience. And from there, I was there for six months. I started Ecoteer.com, which became a portal. Not unlike couch surfing, basically a portal for conservation and ecologists, where you pay a small membership fee, and then you actually volunteer directly with the NGOs. You don’t communicate between a third man. So it’s very much like WOOFING, the same principles as that. It worked really well, boomed really, really well. In the recession, it kind of took on, it exploded during the recession, actually, because lots of people wanted to travel at a time they had money, but then had the time… so it actually did quite well then. But at that same time, I got a job in Malaysia as a first paid job. So I was an intern for like two three years, going between different ecologists and different places. Then on the first paid job back in Malaysia, again working on the turtle project in Perhentian islands, which then kind of changed my direction instead of helping out just these NGOs that were independent from me, I then started running my own project. And that’s where kind of Ecoteer became running its own projects in Malaysia. And that’s where I met Pavin. He actually brought over a disabled group from the UK. He is Malaysian but he was working in UK. And we were just sort of brainstorming ideas. Do you want to come back to Malaysia and brainstorm ideas and that’s where kind of he startup Fuze and then two years later, we then joined the two companies together. That’s where our friendship sort of started on the beach. Yeah, so it’s kind of like Ecoteer has kind of evolved. As I’ve kind of changed my direction, Ecoteer now is no longer really focused on connect some people to individual projects. It is now running our own project in Malaysia. But now we’re going back into offering partnership with a few guys in terms of offering jobs and internships around Asian firms in that way. Yeah. So we’re kind of evolving with the tide. 

Nick   

Why Malaysia? I’m quite interested, you obviously went out there and fell in love with it and you’re still out there. What is it about the country that’s kind of captivated you so much? 

Dan   

Well, I mean, the first thing that Malaysia really sold to me obviously was Borneo. Half of Malaysia is in Borneo. And Sir David Attenborough, orangutans, proboscis monkeys, that was what I was attracted to Malaysia to start with, and I went to Borneo, it was where I worked with Albert Teo, and I lived there for like four years in about one of the best dive sites in the world, in Sipadan. We went on a boat every morning on the Kinabatangan River and we could see orangutans just sat on a boat, you know, it is absolutely amazing, gibbons swinging in the trees. There’s about eight, nine different types of primates there, crocodiles, elephants, everything you can imagine was in this area. So it was quite hard to leave there. But then also the people in Malaysia, I mean, the people were very kind, yeah, very nice people. And I mean that’s one of the big things I stayed in Malaysia for. But also when I moved to Peninsular Malaysia I realised that Malaysia is quite a good country where it’s developing, but also keeping integrity of the environment. I mean, it’s got its problems but in Peninsular Malaysia, the palm oil industry is not such a big issue in terms of deforestation, not so much as in Indonesia, Kalimantan, and Peninsula it’s a lot more controlled. So I can see the issues of development and the environment is kind of handled as well as can be, I think and to balance everything. So yeah, it’s an amazing place. Peninsular Malaysia still has tigers, wild tigers, it still has a lot of elephants, a lot of gibbons, primatologists, Malaysia is an amazing place to be and it was my, the ocean and primatology were my two loves to start with. Yeah and the sea obviously we were quite close to the in Peninsular Malaysia we were just north of the Coral Triangle, Borneo is in the Coral Triangle but in Peninsular just north of it as well. So the coral diversity is quite high. Yeah, so it’s an amazing place to be. 

Nick   

Sounds like an amazing place. Yeah. And actually you are describing very much my gap year. That’s right, two years ago. Taman Negara, I went to the Kinabatangan River, I have said that right? Yeah Borneo too. So yeah, it’s a beautiful, beautiful area that you inhabit. 

Dan   

Yeah, but it means saying that the UK I mean, everywhere it’s beautiful. I mean UK it’s got some beautiful things as well. I mean that’s one thing that I like when I go back home I appreciate it a lot more. And I’m from Plymouth in southwest. So like actually I quite like going back and diving in UK after diving in like 30 degree water in Malaysia I do quite like going diving in UK now. It’s a lot more exciting because you’ve got kelp forest, you got the seals, you know, there’s a lot of things going on for the wildlife in the UK. And I mean, it’s something that people should really the British should really appreciate as well. 

Nick   

Yeah, that was something I felt to having spent, you know, a bit of time traveling around was, I don’t know my backyard very well. I don’t know the UK very well. I should spend more time here and it is beautiful. Yeah, I totally agree. Yeah. One thing you’ve done a lot then seems to be like fusing environmental conservation with enterprise as well. It’s, you know, it’s a social enterprise Fuze Ecoteer. I guess you could have just set up as a charity. You could have relied on donations and gone down that route. What role does enterprise have to play in conservation? And why did you choose that model?  

Dan   

I think it’s got quite a big role, social enterprises, because until now, I’m going to date this now until COVID-19, tourism and eco tourism is a very good model to sustain yourself. So tourism is quite a strong industry, but then also we are looking at other ways of not necessarily just tourism, but enterprise in terms of what products can you sell. So for instance, we actually turn plastic into objects, so we make coasters, we make necklaces, we’re trying to make benches and chairs and things that are a bit more long lasting from recycled plastic. So again, that is something that would generate a little bit of money. It’s not going to keep things going completely, but it would generate a bit of money from the waste. So I think if we could create environmental businesses that can go mainstream, then the whole economy is going to change. The problem with NGOs at the moment is they’re relying on big entities to give them money or very rich people to give them money. So you’re actually relying on polluting or generally environmental damaging entities to give you money generally. But if you’re generating your own income, through being a social enterprise, and doing good at the same time. I mean, in the UK, a social enterprise has been around for a long time. It’s been around since 2002, 2003, and you could say originally was set up as a as a kick, social enterprise community interest company. But here in Malaysia, I mean, social enterprises just now 2020 just being heard of, and there’s no legal entity, which is a social enterprise in Malaysia. So either you are a society or you are a business. So we had to set up as business because I’m a foreigner. So I wasn’t allowed to run a society. So we have to be a an entity where we’re no profit making company. But we run as a social enterprise. But yeah, I mean, we got this plastic work, and there’s also things like chocolate. Malaysia actually produces a lot of cacao. So we’re looking at, we haven’t done this yet, but we’re looking, we created chocolate already. But we haven’t pushed out products yet. That’s something again, we can do reforestation, because the cacao tree actually is a sub canopy tree so it can live in the shade. So you can have the canopy above you have your cacao trees below. So you have a forest and cocoa tree at the same time. So you can have what’s called agro forestry. Again, if that was pushed out wide scale, the Rainforest Alliance is trying to do that, and then you know things will change. Yeah, so I really think social enterprise is the way forward and if we can get some really big social enterprises. Patagonia is the what I recommend is one of the best social enterprises which is actually starting to make a global impact, a global brand, which is a social enterprise, because they do good for the environment and the communities they work in as well. 

Nick   

Yeah. And I guess the thing with enterprise and business whereas charities are doing fantastic work around the globe, but they have a limit, which is the amount of donations they can raise and the amount people are willing to give to them. Whereas something like a social enterprise, which uses a business model to deliver environmental value in this case, is it can be unlimited. You know, if you have a successful business, then it allows you to grow and create more impact. It’s just two different two different models, but it’s a new revenue and new income stream something which is developing faster and I think you’re showing how it works, you know, within ecotourism, within Malaysia, it’s really exciting. 

Dan   

Yeah, even like some of my friends, they have more traditional companies like they have like a pub. So all the profits from this pub in Sarawak goes to orangutans. So it’s called the Oranga bar. All of the profit goes to orangutans. So even just thinking of normal kind of business entities that could actually give back to the environment, you know? It could be like caterers, could be anyone. So then things like when COVID-19 comes, obviously things get affected a bit, but not so bad. I mean, you know, you got to train, put your eggs in many baskets.   

Nick   

Yeah so, resilience. I mean, charity is also having a rough time right now too. So, absolutely, yeah. 

Dan   

Yeah building resilience is the key. 

Nick   

Now a lot of people listening to the podcast are looking to kind of start their career in conservation, and they’re looking for advice from people who’ve been working in it for a while, and understand you know, what are the big things that are going to help them to get to where they want to be more quickly? What advice would you give someone? What advice do you give to your interns even that come through your experiences and go off into the world, you know, seeking employment? What would you give them in order to, you know, to get their first job? What things should they bear in mind?  

Dan   

I think there’s a few things so before you even go, I think you need to look at your skill sets, and the skill sets that if you’re a foreigner going into an NGO you’ve got to realise that it’s going to be quite hard to get full paid employment straightaway. However, there are some things that the NGOs would like to pay for, the services. So for instance, a great way to do long term internship is to actually become a photographer and videographer, to learn how to do social media, how to write a good press release, you know, these are things that kind of, you’re not really going to think about straightaway in conservation, but actually, it’s very, very, very important. And generally, it’s the skills that NGOs generally don’t have, particularly if they’re a small entity, they’re not going to have the sort of skill set. So try to develop yourself, not just in terms of conservation, biology, ecology, you know, try to develop yourself as a useful person to these entities. So I recently had this intern come to me and he said, he’s actually a salesman used to work in recruitment. So in one of the worst sales industry is ever you could be in. And he said, right, I’ve had enough of this, he was only 26. He had enough of it, four years of doing hardcore sales. And he said, okay, I’m going to help NGOs. I want to actually do sales but for NGOs. So he’s going to work 50% of his time to generate money, and 50% of his time, he’s going to be kind of pro bono for different NGOs around Malaysia to help increase their income. So there are many skills you’ve got website building, you know, all these sort of things you can bring to NGO. So first of all, develop yourself and think around the conservation entity. What else do they need, what can you bring? And then the other one main thing I would say is definitely when you’re there, when you actually on the project, really try hard, work really, really hard. Try and make a good impression. Be flexible as well, to show that you can live in different kind of scenarios. Things happen, which you don’t expect to happen and to be positive about those things. So it’s very much your soft skill sets, really improve and show your soft skill sets really good. And then what happens is the conservation world is very small, very small. So if someone’s got a job coming in, and then I’ve actually recommended quite a few of our interns for different jobs, and a lot of them got it. Malaysians like locals, Malaysians, but also internationals as well. And one of our interns has got a job working for an elephant sanctuary in Cambodia. So it’s really working hard, networking, and yeah, being a good person, easy to get along with not causing problems and then those sort of things will then go on and easy to work with. And then I will then tell as your internship manager, I would then say here that this guy’s great. Go for it. There’s no problem with his personality or anything like that. Yeah, that’s the way to do it. 

Nick   

Yeah, that’s great advice so work on your softer transferable skills, the things beyond just the specialist knowledge in conservation, but communications and other things and then networking. And it also seems like a dirty word networking. But the way I think about it is like making friends just go and make friends in conservation, you know, be helpful, be nice be useful. And you know, it’s such a small community like you say, yeah, that, you know, the word kind of goes around. Yeah, that’s great advice. 

Dan   

I like that make friends. It’s a nice way of putting it.  

Nick   

Yeah. It’s a much nicer way of thinking about it. It’s the same thing. It’s the same thing. Isn’t it? Really? Yeah. Great. Well, it’s been really nice chat at the end of the podcast, I just ask some sort of fairly bigger open questions just to kind of hear how you think really what’s important to you? And one thing we’ve asked quite a few people that is quite interesting to ask is, if you could like make one change on the planet, if you could, like enact one law, if I could make you know, global tsar for the day, that would make a big impact for the environment, big impact for wildlife, what thing would you like to see change? Have you got something got an idea that you’d like to enable? 

Dan   

Okay. I think the biggest thing would be everyone has to work from home. Yeah.  

Nick   

It’s very timely; it’s what we’re all doing. 

Dan   

Yeah actually it’s very simple thing but everyone should be working from home eventually. Just having that reduction in the pollution and the amount of petrol being used that would be a huge difference to the world. Yeah, working from home.  

Nick   

What does Malaysia look like right now in lockdown? We are recording this in COVID times. I mean, is it quieter outside? 

Dan   

I mean it’s actually quite good. The street dogs are roaming in the streets now rather than the cars. We’ve had turtles nesting on very horrible polluted beaches normally, but they’re nesting in beaches now which is great. And that is in the Straits of Malacca, which is probably one of the most polluted water bodies in the world. Yeah, it’s really nice and quiet. And also the nice thing about it is people are starting to work. together. I’ve really noticed over here that everyone, you look on social media now and people are actually talking about how they’re helping people rather than about them and things like that actually saying that so I’ve helped to donate this money to this cause. You know, and we’ve done a few fundraising as well, fundraising campaigns. And everyone’s been very, very generous. Oh, yeah, I mean, that’s another great thing about the COVID-19 is the camaraderie people are starting now making the community, I mean, online, but it’s still there. It’s great. So I mean, that’s a really nice thing about it, as well. So I really hope that some of the lessons we’re learning from this that we actually take on afterwards as well. I mean, a lot of conservationists are to be honest. But yeah, I mean, also like, we had a session yesterday, with university students, and they’re all now talking about they want to travel around UK, rather than traveling to Malaysia because they want to help out the local economy. They want to explore UK more. Search our back yard. And that’s something else would be really nice as well, because I talked to some agents, they’re like, well, you know more about Malaysia than me and saying that they’ve been around the UK more than I have. Yeah. So it’s getting to know your backyard. COVID-19 would bring these changes long term as well. 

Nick   

Yeah, absolutely. Just feel like there is some kind of silver linings to what’s going on. Yeah, despite all the troubles in the world, it feels like we’re learning some lessons. And I think that idea of just traveling less actually, in a way working from home, trying to work more effectively, remotely, just like we do right now over Zoom and other things. You know, it makes a big difference to the planet. We’re given the planet a bit of a break. Yeah. So it’s been really nice to chat Daniel and to get to know you a little bit better. If people want to find out a little bit more about Fuze Ecoteer and the things that are involved with perhaps they want to get involved. Where should we send them? 

Dan   

Yeah, if you go to our website, www.fuze-ecoteer.com, it’s our website, you can find all of our stuff on there, but also we’re quite big on Facebook but then also Instagram as well. So if you put Fuze Ecoteer into Google, you’ll find us either on our website or Instagram or Facebook. 

Nick   

Great. And as always, we’ll link from the notes and there’s no MySpace account, no? 

Dan   

No there was. There was a MySpace. Thank you, Nick. It’s been a pleasure talking to you as well.   

Nick   

Likewise.  

Dan   

Really nice and to all of the Conservation Career listeners as well. So I really hope that you guys go out there make a difference. And yeah, like, tell people about it.  

Nick   

Okay, thank you very much.  

Dan   

Awesome. Thank you. Take care you guys.  

Nick   

Okay, well, I hope you enjoyed that everyone. If you did then please do hit that subscribe button to get notified when new episodes are live and also give the ratings it really helps us to get in front of more people. If you enjoy the interviews, we’ve collected the best advice from over 400 professional conservationists into a free eBook, which you can download from the bottom of our website. And finally, if you’ve got any questions or suggestions for the podcast, please tweet them to @ConservCareers. We’d love to hear from you. Okay, till next time, guys, this is Nick signing out. 

Careers Advice, Podcast

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