Overview

Scuba Dive in the Indian Ocean on this critical conservation expedition AND get career training from Conservation Careers!

Get your PADI Advanced Open Water and PADI Coral Reef Research Diver qualifications as a member of an expedition team working on critical marine conservation projects in the pristine islands of the Seychelles. Your participation in marine species research will contribute towards providing data to the local government on various conservation initiatives.

scuba divers

Overview

Travel to the crystal clear waters of the Indian Ocean as a member of an expedition and work on critical marine conservation projects amongst the beautiful islands of the Seychelles.

You will contribute towards various conservation-related surveys aimed at providing data to the local government on coral reef research, fish, and invertebrate surveys and assist with the development of an environmental education and awareness program as well as marine plastic pollution cleanups and surveys.

You will spend the majority of your time on this expedition scuba diving and as such you need to be qualified to at least PADI Open Water, or equivalent.  For non-divers wishing to attend, we can recommend local dive centers that will help you qualify before your intended start date. Receive the Coral Reef Research Diver Distinctive Speciality segment of the PADI Divemaster course. This unique offering teaches you about best practices when conducting underwater coral reef surveys. This is offered to participants staying for 2 weeks or longer.

Highlights

  • Learning how to identify fish and coral in the Indian Ocean
  • Earning your PADI Advanced Open Water certificate.
  • Complete a unique qualification, the PADI Coral Reef Research Speciality.
  • Exploring different dive sites among the tropical islands of the Seychelles, searching for the incredible ‘mega-fauna’ in the area, such as sharks, rays, and dolphins. Take other extra dive courses with local dive shops.
  • Developing the techniques needed to survey coral reefs.

conservationists on a mountainside

Testimonial

“I had a brilliant time, the staff were really friendly and welcoming and I loved all the activities. There was so much variety and a lot to learn – I would definitely go back. This experience has made me change my career to what I love and I’m currently now looking for marine research/science work throughout the world. This experience has made me reconsider what I want from life.”- Lynsey Wheater (UK).

Our Award-winning Partner

Conservation Careers has teamed up a family-run organisation with an amazing culture and an awesome team of people across the world who are passionate experts in their chosen field and will make your experience a truly unforgettable one (in a good way).

Their award-winning projects receive over 2000 participants every year, and we’re proud to say that the vast majority of them describe their experience with them as ‘life changing’. Their approval rate from over 20 000 participants since 1997 is over 95%.

A key component of the success of their community development and conservation projects is the participants who join their programs. Opportunities include high impact volunteering from one week and up, internships for those looking for career development opportunities, Challenges that allow a one week adventure all for a good cause and a range of programs for school groups and younger volunteers.

If you register your interest below, you’ll put you in touch with our partner to take the booking and to plan your trip!

See all our Conservation Careers Internship opportunities.

Location and Life on Base

Our base is located in Baie Ternay Marine National Park, a 3-minute walk from the beach. The building was originally a school that has been  transformed into an eco-friendly research base with classrooms for presentations, a recreation room to relax after a day of diving, giant hammocks for more relaxation, and a large grassy area with benches for eating or studying. Life on base is much like a big family and we share cooking and tidying duties on a rotation basis. Those who have completed their intensive survey and dive training, can look forward to a short boat trip to the dive site once or twice about 5 days a week, depending on the quality of weather conditions. On other days, participants conduct either marine debris surveys or environmental education sessions with the local community depending on the project needs at the time. Days start early with boat preparations, or training, and are rounded off with an evening debrief, followed by dinner and time to relax, take in the beautiful sunset, and share stories.

Accommodation

Participants sleep in dorm rooms of up to 10 people. Bathrooms are shared but split-sex, with showers and flush toilets. The entire building is equipped with electricity.

Meals

Sample the many flavours of Seychellois cuisine, from coconut water sipped fresh out of the fruit to green papaya salad. All food is provided by us and prepared by participants. Breakfasts include the usual eggs, bacon, toast, pancakes, cereals, and fruit. Lunch and dinner varies based on the tastes of participants at the time. Common meals include curries, stir fries, pastas, pies, and salas. Many participants also buy their own snacks, like banana chips and dried salted fish.

Communication

We are based in a protected natural reserve which means that signal does not cover the entire area. There are spots with good phone cover and we have a phone on base for emergencies. For high speed connectivity, our participants travel to Victoria’s many internet cafes.

Transportation

We provide transfers from the airport to our base in Baie Ternay National Park, which is about an hour’s drive. The beach is very close to our accommodation so we simply walk down the water to the boats, which are available to take participants out for a dive.

Climate

Seychelles has an equatorial climate, which means sunshine and warm waters year round. Tropical rainfall is common but more frequent from January to May and October to December. Weather is warmest from September through to May, and coolest in the middle of the year, from June to August, and water temperatures reflect these changes too.

scuba divers

Your impact

All of our programs have short, mid and long-term objectives that fit with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals or UN SDGs. This enables us to report on our collaborative impact across the world in a streamlined manner, measuring which UN SDGs we are making a substantial contribution to. Furthermore, this will help our local partners and communities measure and visualise their contribution to the UN SDGs.

Upon arrival to base, you will be educated about the history of the UN SDGs. You will learn about the specific goals of your location, the long-, mid- and short-term objectives, and also clarification of how your personal, shorter-term involvement contributes to these goals on a global level.

Our aim is to educate you on local and global issues, so that you continue to act as active global citizens after your program, helping to fulfil our mission of building a global network of people united by their passion to make a difference.

Healthy corals are key to the health of our planet. They help fish populations regenerate themselves providing shelter for young fish, they assist in removing excess carbon dioxide from our atmosphere, and protect living spaces near the shore from damage by waves and storms.

In 1998 a massive coral bleaching event decimated many coral reefs around the globe, including the reefs surrounding the inner granitic islands of Seychelles. Coral bleaching occurs when rising water temperatures cause the algae that live on corals to detach themselves from their hosts. Algae is the main food source for corals and helps to maintain the structure of the corals. Warm waters are the result of climate change caused by excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

Efforts to monitor the recovery of reefs in Seychelles were initiated after the 1998 event. This began with a 3 year project, named the Shoals of Capricorn, which extensively monitored the entire inner islands. The Seychelles Centre for Marine Research & Technology, SCMRT, was set up at this time to continue the work, and to aid the Seychelles National Parks Authority, SNPA, with the management of the marine parks. After the Shoals of Capricorn project the monitoring was then taken over by Reef Care International.

In addition to the high seasonal sea temperatures, the coral reefs around Seychelles, face numerous other threats such as population pressure, poaching, and unsustainable tourism, all of which are challenging to quantify without a solid, scientific basis. In order to effectively manage and conserve the reef, a continuous monitoring program is necessary to build up a comprehensive picture of the ecological health of the reef.

Coral and Fish Surveys

We established our project in Seychelles in 2004 with the aim of aiding SNPA. At over 20 sites across the North-West coast of Mahe, staff and participants use the protocols of Reef Care International in order to survey the reefs noting the health of existing coral, evidence of new young coral growing on the reef, as well as fish species present and their numbers. Data on coral recovery, as well as fish abundance and diversity is passed on to the SNPA to assist with their management decisions, which might include updates to policies, expanding currently protected areas, or protecting additional areas. In addition, participants use a different coral monitoring technique, to provide data to CoralWatch, a worldwide coral monitoring methodology, based in Queensland University, Australia, which aims to monitor coral bleaching and recovery events around the globe.

Commercial Marine Species Surveys

Unsustainable fishing is also a threat to the health of the Seychellois marine life. In addition this also affects the wellbeing of the local community, because many rely on fish for daily sustenance, and the growth of the local economy, because seafood from Seychelles is sold to international visitors to the islands and consumers abroad. Its underwater treasures are also the reason why many visit every year, bringing capital into the country. We assist Seychelles Fishing Authority, SFA with monitoring commonly harvested species like octopus, lobster, and sea cucumber populations.

Marine Megafauna Sightings

Incidental sightings of marine megafauna like reef sharks and sea turtles occur frequently during dives, and this information is noted and passed on to the Ocean Biogeographic Information System or OBIS Seamap, an online database designed to keep track of various larger marine species around the world.

tiger shark

Marine Plastic Pollution Cleanups

Ocean floor clean up dives are also regularly conducted as part of the Dive Against Debris or DAD initiative. The data about marine plastics collected is sent on to Project AWARE an organisation established to monitor the abundance and diversity of marine debris around the world.

Environmental Education

Environmental education is also an important part of our Mahe program. The main aim of this program is to get locals involved in discussions around issues affecting their marine environment.

The main United Nations Sustainable Development Goal we work on at Mahe is #14, Life Below Water.

Project Objectives

Mahe, Seychelles Long-term Objectives:

1. Provide a long-term and consistent collection of data, assessing the overall health and development of the reef system in Northern Mahe on behalf of the Seychelles National Parks Authority, SNPA, to be used for regional coastal marine management and international understanding of changing reef systems.

2. Increase the scientific output and awareness of the project through the publication of findings.

3. Continue to support the International School of Seychelles by providing their students with environmental education with a strong focus on marine ecosystems and their inhabitants.

4. Increase in-country capacity by providing training in environmental education and training to local communities.

5. Continue to minimise our environmental impact at Cap Ternay and raise awareness of environmental issues amongst participants and visitors.

scuba diver

Exploration

Joining a program not only allows participants to collaborate with communities or work toward preserving unique ecosystems but it also offers plenty of opportunities to explore the surrounding area or travel further to see what other parts of the region have to offer.

Long term field staff are a great source of advice, and have helped us put together the following information on local travel options. Many decide to travel before or after their experience (subject to immigration restrictions), solidifying the lifetime friendships established on program. Please note that the below suggestions are not included in the program fee, and are for the individual to organise at their own expense.

Weekend trips

Victoria City

Victoria is only an hour from our base in Baie Ternay Marine National Park. Learn more about the particular blend of cultures that have shaped the Seychelles over the centuries. Visit Hindu temples built adjacent to Catholic cathedrals and sample dishes with both French and Indian influences.

Inner Island Hopping

From the capital of Victoria, you can catch a ferry to many of the other inner islands like Praslin, La Digue, Silhouette, Felicity, and Sister. Praslin is home to the Vallee de Mai National Park, a verdant palm forest thought by early explorers to be the original ‘Garden of Eden’ and now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Praslin, and nearby Curieuse, are some of the only Seychellois islands home to the famous Coco de Mer palm whose seed is the largest known on earth. The island is home to the endangered Seychelles Black Parrot as well as many other endemic plants and animals. While in Praslin you could even visit our island and coastal conservation base on nearby Curieuse island. La Digue is the picture perfect tropical island, with several quaint guest houses and arguably the most beautiful beach in the world, Anse Source d’Argent.

scuba divers

Hiking and climbing

The inner islands of the Seychelles, where you will be staying while on this project, are made of granite which means there are many opportunities for climbing available. Visit Morne Seychellois National Park to hike or climb the highest peak in the Seychelles.

Water sports

Other than diving there are many other water sports in the Seychelles, like surfing, kayaking, sailing, snorkeling, and of course simply swimming in the ocean or relaxing on the beach.

Beau Vallon Bay

The most popular tourist spot on the main island of the Seychelles, Beau Vallon offers a massive stretch of beach lined with shops and restaurants.

Cap Matoopa hike

Cap Matoopa is the name of the highest point next to our base, and offers spectacular views of Cap Ternay bay. Trek the jungle encrusted granite climb to the top to be rewarded with a magical Indian Ocean vista like no other.

Recreational diving

The dives we conduct on the project have a strict research focus. However there are plenty of opportunities to go for a recreational dive in your free time.

scuba divers ready to dive

Cultural immersion

Engaging intimately with a new context teaches not only global awareness but adaptability and critical thinking, skills highly valued in the modern marketplace. Local and cultural immersion is encouraged on all our programs around the world, and is also one of the most enjoyable aspects of your experience. Luckily, there are many activities you can get involved with in your free time, or before and after your program. On our community programs the focus is on cultural topics, while on marine or wildlife programs the emphasis is more on the environmental element. Use your evenings and weekends to explore diverse and eclectic topics like Theravada Buddhism in Laos or how plastic pollution and climate change affects Indian Ocean coral.

Baie Ternay Marine National Park

Our marine research base is located in the secluded Baie Ternay Marine National Park, a protected coastal reserve, about an hour’s drive from the capital of Victoria and the Seychelles International Airport. The beautiful bay area consists of coastal habitats including mangroves wetlands, seagrass beds, and coral reefs. Among the mangroves you will find species of fish, crab, and birds found exclusively in the Seychelles. Venture further into the water and spy green and hawksbill turtles snacking on seagrass. Deeper in, corals reefs start to span the ocean floor. The dazzling diversity of this underwater garden will surprise you. Here you can also spot emperor angelfish, butterflyfish, octopus, white-tip reef sharks and manta rays. You might even be lucky enough to spot one of the whale sharks who visit the islands for a short time every year.

Mahe

The marine conservation program in the Seychelles is based on the main island of Mahe, the largest granitic island in the Seychelles, surrounded by coral reef, granite drop offs and white sandy beaches. The island rises up to forest-covered mountainous terrain with steep winding roads throughout the island. Turquoise-blue waters house expansive fringing reefs providing habitats to a staggering variety of fish and marine invertebrates. The steep shelf surrounding the islands mean that along with the high diversity of reef fish, oceanic species such as tuna and sailfish are common just offshore. It is home to the capital of the Seychelles, Victoria. Despite being the most populous island in the Seychelles, it is has very few inhabitants compared to most of the urban areas international visitors are use to, and Mahe’s natural habitat is very well-preserved.

Seychelles

The Seychelles is a tropical archipelago off the East Coast of Africa, consisting of 100 islands. Islands located near the center of the group are made of granite and researchers believe that this means they use to form part of the Indian subcontinent. The granite islands attracted corals to their shallower waters and most of the outer islands of the Seychelles are based on coral or sand. The islands are famous for their biodiversity and are home to literally thousands of land and underwater species. The waters of the Indian Ocean are a haven for coral conservation efforts making the Seychelles a sought-after diving destination.

view out to the ocean

BONUS! Kick-starter online training for Early Career Conservationists (worth £295)

Conservation CareersFeeling lost in your conservation job hunt? Want to work in conservation, but don’t know where to start? Get your career on track with the Kick-starter online training for Early Career Conservationists designed to help you understand the job market, to navigate your career options, and to get hired more quickly.

Whether you’re at university and planning your next steps, a graduate in the job hunt or working in an unrelated job but interested to switch into conservation, this course is designed to help you.

This unique online course has been designed to increase your chances of success, and is being specially organised and run by Conservation Careers.

All you need to do is register your interest in the project below, and if you choose to make a booking we’ll save a place for you on our course when you get back from your placement.

Included in the course is a year’s full-access membership of the Conservation Careers Academy, which includes access to over 8,000 jobs, 1,500 training courses, live training events and many more career-boosting options.

Duration, Dates & Cost

  • 2 weeks £2,095
  • 4 weeks £2,695
  • 6 weeks £3,295
  • 8 weeks £3,845
  • 10 weeks £4,395
  • 12 weeks £4,995

Start dates are as follows:

  • 2021: 06 Mar; 20 Mar; 03 Apr; 17 Apr; 01 May; 15 May; 29 May; 12 Jun; 26 Jun; 10 Jul; 24 Jul; 07 Aug; 21 Aug; 04 Sep; 18 Sep; 02 Oct; 16 Oct; 30 Oct; 13 Nov; 27 Nov

What’s Included

  • 24-hour emergency desk
  • 24-hour in-country support
  • Access to Alumni Services and Discounts
  • Airport pick-up (unless otherwise stated)
  • All necessary project equipment and materials
  • All necessary project training by experienced staff
  • Community work workshop
  • Coral reef ecology
  • Diving compressor training workshop
  • First Aid & CPR training
  • Location orientation
  • Long term experienced staff
  • Meals while on project (except on work placements for long term internships)
  • National Park fees and permits
  • PADI Advanced Open Water
  • PADI Coral Reef Research Diver Distinctive Speciality
  • Safe and basic accommodations (usually shared)
  • Use of O2 equipment workshop
  • Welcome meeting

Increasing Employability: Pre Departure Program Training:

Our programs are not only life-changing experiences but are also designed to help participants increase their employability. We have developed a curriculum to be completed prior to arrival in the country in order to ensure that more time is dedicated to program work once you commence your volunteer program.

Eight weeks prior to your start date, you will complete the following online courses in preparation for your in-country program:

PRE-DEPARTURE ORIENTATION (1 hour)

PROGRAM SPECIFIC TRAINING (1 – 5 hours)

OPTIONAL: MARINE CONSERVATION COURSE (10 – 15 hours)

In order to obtain a certificate for the Marine Conservation course which is endorsed by the University of Richmond and UNC Charlotte, you will need to complete quizzes & assignments and will be given 4 weeks post program to submit your work.

If you are looking to travel in less than 8 weeks from now, you will still complete the course however this will be done in country and all content will need to be downloaded before arrival.

Health & Hygiene:

The work we contribute to across the globe remains important and new measures allow our participants to continue to join our programs and continue impacting positively on their world and the communities we work with. Changes to our existing protocols have been made by our health and hygiene team to strengthen our health and hygiene protocols and ensure that international standard safeguards are in place to protect our participants, staff and host communities. Please inquire for more information on the protocols.

What’s Not Included

  • Additional drinks and gratuities
  • COVID-19: Health and Hygiene Fee
  • Extra local excursions
  • Flights
  • International and domestic airport taxes
  • Medical and travel insurance
  • PADI Open Water
  • Personal dive kit, e.g. mask, fins, wetsuit, timer etc.
  • Personal items and toiletries
  • Police or background check
  • Visa costs (where necessary)

woman sitting on a rock in the ocean

Reserve your place or ask a question

About Conservation Careers

Conservation Careers has teamed up a family-run organisation with an amazing culture and an awesome team of people across the world who are passionate experts in their chosen field and will make your experience a truly unforgettable one (in a good way).

Their award-winning projects receive over 2000 participants every year, and we’re proud to say that the vast majority of them describe their experience with them as ‘life changing’. Their approval rate from over 20 000 participants since 1997 is over 95%.

A key component of the success of their community development and conservation projects is the participants who join their programs.